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my latest assignment: a series in ‘the new york times’

AN OUT-OF-THE-BLUE email in April 2020 shook me out of my “new normal” routine. It was an invitation from a “New York Times” editor to create a series of how-to garden articles for their readers who are finding themselves at home, in spring, and maybe could use the kind of information you come to my newsletter and my website and podcast for.

The first installment appeared April 20, 2020. On March 31, 2021, the paper ran a Q&A with me to kick off Year 2 of the series.

The topics I’ve covered so far:

I WAS FLATTERED to be asked, of course, but most of all, I’m pleased that a media outlet as widely read as “The New York Times” understood that the garden is a place of refuge—but can also be a little daunting!—and committed to offer their readers support in these dystopian times since the pandemic began.

The more happy garden moments that happen around the nation, and world, the better, I figure.

I’m also pleased that I get to write again for the place of my start as a journalist all those years ago. A mini-homecoming.

Go say hello; if you are a “New York Times” subscriber or haven’t used your quota of free articles this month, you should be able to click through. Comments are open to subscribers, who are even invited to ask questions. Uh-oh, I guess I know what I’ll be doing even more of than ever …

Frog with headphones
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  1. Linda Bridges says:

    I’m aiming at no lawn! Rock paths, large and small gardens, flowers everywhere, succulent beds, bird baths and feeders!

  2. Nancy Natale says:

    Margaret, do you have any recommendations for preventing voles (or some other creature) from eating the roots of my ornamental grasses? Just when the grasses are achieving maturity at around three years, the roots are being completely eaten so that the plants are destroyed. The grasses are integrated in the garden with other types of plants but are being chosen for destruction. This fall I lost four good-sized bluestem grasses. I would appreciate your suggestions. Thank you!

  3. Kathleen Geiger says:

    Thank you for your podcast! It is a lot of fun to listen to especially in the dark days of winter.
    All the best to you!

  4. Terry says:

    Too bad all of the above writings are behind a paywall. Would love to share and learn more, but I and most all I know, are on a limited income.

  5. Sandra says:

    I would ❤️ to read your NY Times’ articles but alas, one must pay to do so. As a senior citizen, with a limited income, that’s not an option for me. It makes me o.

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