about my email newsletter & podcast

‘I do so enjoy your newsletters. I can have 15 or 20 unopened e-mails staring at me and I will always look at  yours.’—E.

I LIKE HAVING YOU AROUND, SEE? I hope it’s mutual. You can just show up spontaneously, anytime; we’re always open. But even better: subscribe to my free email newsletter by inserting your email into the form below–in the lower half of the little box (where you can also subscribe to my weekly podcasts). That way you won’t miss anything, ever.

Frog with headphones
Don’t Miss Out!

Get my award-winning podcast...

Listen on Apple Podcasts

...and my ribbiting free newsletter.

Once (or occasionally twice) a week year-round, I publish an edition that rounds up what’s on the podcast and website. I also try to let you know what else I’m up to—in the garden and otherwise—whether an event I’m giving, or my newest book, or an occasional rant about the weather, or about a great link or website I’m enjoying or a workshop I’m giving, or who knows what.

Here’s my commitment: I won’t use your email for anything else, or share it with any other person or company. If I get to be too much, you can unsubscribe at any time from the link on any issue with a simple click, though I hope our relationship won’t come to that.

Here are more examples of subscriber feedback:

“Thank you so much for your blog and your honesty.  The bright green frog has been a welcome ‘hello’ the last few months.  I feel connected to you through our mutual love of nature and our commitment to work in it.”—A.

“I’ve been enjoying your gardening newsletter for about a year–it inspires me to do more with my northern garden, informs me of myriad possibilities, yet with a comforting context for things that don’t always work out.”–L.

“You are a brave soul and are living the dream. I love feeling connected to you and your garden/life adventures through your newsletter.”–S.

“Margaret, you’ll never get rid of me. Thank you for your generosity.”—P.

Ready to subscribe? As the fat frog at the top of any page on this website will tell you, the newsletter is ribbiting. Don’t miss out! Oh, and the podcast is pretty popular, too.

  1. Renee Shamosh says:

    Thank you for your wonderful presentation yesterday at the Shirley Meneice Horticulture Conference.
    Renee Shamosh, Horticulture Co-chair, Garden Club of Irvington

  2. Susan says:

    I M losing my cherished but reduced ability to garden. I have a progressive movement disorder and each year as I contemplate what is possible , I realize someone else will do for me what they can. But there were so many possibilities when we first came here. I think I may choose to follow you in your adventures so to replace my own — let the garden grow!

    1. margaret says:

      Let the garden grow indeed, outdoors and also in. I take great pleasure in my indoor plant companions, too — the houseplants demand much less attention and give me lots of joy. Thanks for your very poignant comment, Susan.

  3. Ed White says:

    Loved the feature on you April 1, 2021. I never thought of gardening as a life practice, but now that I have that in my mind, it seems like how I’ve felt about it forever.

    1. margaret says:

      Thank you, Ed for kind words. Yes, for me it is just that … and I am glad that it is (even if till now subconsciously) for you, too.

  4. Mary Burton says:

    Your blog will not except my email address. I would love to receive your newsletter. I’ve tried many times,,it’s the only addy I have.
    I’m reading your books and loving them.

    1. margaret says:

      I emailed you, Mary, with instructions how to send an email to my newsletter company (AWeber) to unblock your address from their lists. Happens occasionally with certain email companies, but easy to fix. Look for an email from me with the details.

  5. George Elliott says:

    I retired from teaching horticulture at UConn, now enjoy more time tending my own garden. I was instantly taken by the sensibility of your writing. I’m neither organic (don’t get me started on the USDA NOP) nor vegetarian, but nevertheless discern an affinity in attitude. Many years ago I spent a week in a Zendo in LA, and my main take-away from that experience was meditation in motion. Draw water, carry wood; pull weeds, spread mulch.

    1. margaret says:

      Thanks for the nice note, George. I do practice weeding as a moving meditation indeed, and often refer to it as such. Love hearing from others who approach it (and each task) likewise.

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