slideshow: name that flowering clematis vine!

I HAVE A LOT OF PLANTS (and a lot more that used to grow here somewhere live on in memory). I even know most of their names–except when it comes to the Clematis.  Why didn’t I label those? In the process of trying to put names to vines that are exploding all around me right now, I made a little slideshow for the record. Hey, if it’s on the internet, I can refer to it any time I forget who’s who again, right?

To get things straight, I needed help on varieties such as charming little Clematis crispa (above) from Dan Long at Brushwood Nursery (remember our recent Q&A together on vines and climbing roses?), and even at that I turned up one or two after I thought I’d got the whole list settled.

Not a large-flowered variety among them, it turns out, and more straight species (non-hybrids, just as nature made them) than I would have guessed—including several native American ones (the crispa, and another little one called Clematis viorna you’ll see in the slides). Now let’s see if I can get this (mostly) correct:

The Clematis Slideshow

CLICK THE FIRST THUMBNAIL to start the slides, then toggle between images with the arrows on your keyboard, or the ones beside each caption. Note: There is a list of links to more stories about Clematis below the slideshow.

Other A Way to Garden Stories on Vines

More Clematis Information on the Web

DAN LONG OF Brushwood recommends Clematis on the Web
 as “the world’s most complete clematis reference for most species and
 hybrids.”  For fans of the native American Viorna Group specifically (including not just viorna but crispa and texensis and other charmers), try American Bells, he says
, from Carol Lim.

24 comments
June 26, 2012

comments

  1. Penny W says

    Thank you for the slideshow! I am a big fan of Clematis and among the 5 Clematis in my yard, one of my favorites is “Princess Diana” It is also a tulip shaped variety. I wish I could find the Clematis Tangutica because that would be beautiful in my back yard! Thanks again!

  2. Beth says

    I noticed in some of the pictures that the number of petals on a flower range from 4-6, even on the same plant. Interesting, is this normal for clematis? Years ago my mom planted a clematis at the end of our porch, with a trellis above it which she hoped it would climb. Unfortunately the trellis was buffeted by the wind and the plant never could latch on. So the clematis stayed in a little clump at the bottom of the large empty trellis for several years. As a result I’ve (unfairly) written them off as difficult. It’s good to see your success stories; I may have to give them a try.

  3. Deborah Banks says

    I love your slide shows, but one frustrating feature for me is that only the first line of your description below the picture is visible. I’ve tried all the screen resolutions available on my laptop, with no improvement, and got rid of all the toolbars. Still I can’t see more than the first line. Any hints?

  4. says

    Margaret,

    You inspired me to use yesterday’s rainy day to search through my bag of plant tags and order receipts to identify the pictures I’ve taken of clematis that have established a foothold in my garden. Sadly, I seem to have planted a lot more over the years than bloom for me now. I do have some large flowered clematis, but I am loving the small ones like Betty Corning too.

  5. says

    On petal count- Beth, the number can vary especially on complex hybrids. sometimes they want to be like Mama; other times Papa. By the way, it’s just a technicality but they’re actually called tepals. Just another one of those fun things taxonomists like to do to keep us on our toes! :)

  6. Beth says

    Thanks for that Dan! I like knowing those little details. Tepals… and I see they are on lilies and tulips as well!

  7. Jill says

    WOW Margaret – just awesome and inspiring – I am going to add to my 3 clematis I got from Dan this year just as soon as possible! Thank you.

  8. Lisa-St. Marys ON says

    I have the same problem as Deborah. I get rid of as many Google tool bars at the top of my screen as possible, and then I hide the bottom bar, but I still only get a few lines of text.

  9. Janet says

    One of my favorites is ‘Betty Corning’ It is a vitacelia. Blooms on new growth so I cut it down to about 12-14 inches on a winter day when I just ha ve to garden and it rewards me with wonderful pale lavender blue flowers in June and July.

  10. says

    Great photos Margaret and lovely Clematis, some of which I’ve never seen before. My favorite Clematis is C. viticella ‘Betty Corning’ and Betty was as lovely too! It’s in bloom right now beside an oriental lily called ‘Robino’–lavender and dusky pink!

  11. Donna says

    I put in a clematis late and it went right to that petticoat looking frilly stage. I bought it from my garden center but was not able to put it into the ground for a few days. I’m not sure if it gave up the ghost or what. My other clematis vines have flowers but that’s because former owner of my house obviously had a green thumb. Do I take it out? Did I just miss the bloom time? Or is it prettily dead? As you can see by my adjectives, I’m a beginning gardener:) husband to let it alone, it’s getting adjusted. I think he just doesn’t want to have to dig it up.

    • says

      Hi, Donna. Don’t worry at all. The stress of transplant etc. especially at flowering time may have made it hurry through its paces, butkeep it well-watered (VERY important this year and next) and all should be good. Plants need awhile to settle in to new surroundings (like people!).

  12. Donna says

    Thanks, Margaret. Will be patient and send it positive thoughts! Maybe it will soon
    feel competitive with the other Clematis that are blazing away like purple pinwheels:)

  13. erin bailey says

    Hi Margaret,
    When you posted about your c. tangutica earlier this year, I looked online for it, but never found one with purple stamens (or are they the true flower?). Does the purple fade to brown? Or is this a selected strain?
    Also, Clematis integrifolia is supposed to have fragrance. Does Roguchi have a scent in your garden? Does the little unidentified blue bell have a scent?
    Thanks,
    Erin

  14. erin bailey says

    Hi Margaret,
    When you posted about your c. tangutica earlier this year, I looked online for it, but never found one with purple stamens (or are they the true flower?). Does the purple fade to brown? Or is this a selected strain?
    Also, Clematis integrifolia is supposed to have fragrance. Does Roguchi have a scent in your garden? Does the little unidentified blue bell have a scent?
    Thanks,
    Erin

    Oops, the unidentified one is fully open, but it is the one you thought might be integifolia.

    • says

      Hi, Erin. Try looking for ‘Bill McKenzie’ or ‘Golden Tiara’ on catalog and images searches and see if one of those tanguticas looks more to your taste. And yes, the purple sort of mellows — actually I can’t recall how it starts and ends, but it is variable. I don’t notice a scent on the others but will check!

  15. Sandra says

    Wonderful slide show, could almost be there! One of my own favourites is Clematis Rehderiana, it has the most wonderful little nodding yellow flowers similar to cowslips and a beautiful scent. Took a while to track it down but worth the search.

  16. Marie S. says

    Hi Margaret, You have lovely and healthy clematis…I too, have several clematiis but my leaves always turn brown and ugly …why…? too much fertilizer, Lime, love and care. I love to garden and always weeding, cultivating and deadheading my garden but when it comes to clematis I have problems with the leaves turning brown…so I usually cut it down to 12 inches because I don’t like seeing the brown leaves. What is the solution to caring for clematis? Thank you. I love your website and have followed you for many years….I think you wrote for Newsday and was afffiliated with Martha Stewart. Thanks for being here. Marie

    • says

      Hi, Marie. Do you mean they go brown in spring and summer, or ? Do you know the names of the ones you grow or when they bloom (what time and for about how long)? You can email me at awaytogarden at gmail dot com as well.

  17. Sandra says

    Margaret it is a must, I grew it scrambling over my garden shed in Southern Ireland so I reckon your climate would also be just right for it… A true delight

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