hellebore porn: a fast look at 2010′s bloomers

hellebore 4I DON’T KNOW WHAT MORE I CAN SAY in praise of hellebores. I’ve told you that I rely on them for my garden’s earliest burst of major perennial color, and that they are among my favorite evergreen groundcovers, happy even in some tough spots here and asking for little care. So rather than say that all again in more detail, how about some pure hellebore porn? After all, these Helleborus orientalis are sexy plants, which freely mate and create endless new color variations. Which you can see in this latest slideshow…

Click on the first thumbnail to start the show, then toggle from slide to slide using the arrows beside each caption. Enjoy!

38 comments
April 7, 2010

comments

  1. says

    Hi Margaret,

    The first time you plant your hellebores, when do you expect them to bloom? It sounds like they are a (very) early spring bloomer… I planted mine in probably April this year. Am I going to have to wait until 2011 to get excited?? thanks!

  2. Skye says

    I don’t know about these flowers. Do you grow them from bulbs? Are they planted in the fall for spring blooms? They are very pretty!

    • says

      Welcome, Skye. No, not bulbs, but perennials…can grow from seed (slow) or buy in pots already a few year sold and blooming. Can plant spring or early fall, and bloom late winter/very early spring. Evergreen foliage lasts a whole year…then you cut it back and another year’s worth flushes out. Great shade groundcover!

  3. Skye says

    Thanks for the information, Margaret. I’ll be putting them on my gardening list for this year’s purchases. I don’t know how I’ve not noticed them before. I’m always interested in new varieties of plants.
    I really like all the information on your site! I saw you on “Martha” this morning and had to check it out. Like you and Martha (and so many others), I love gardening, animals, nature, and solitude. I will be checking back here often.

  4. Skye says

    I have been researching these lovely flowers since reading about them here, but sadly, I have been reading that they are poisonous. Being both a dog and cat owner, now I am having second thoughts about planting them. What do you think?

  5. Allison says

    Beautiful. I just bought my first one this year. It is in a sunny to partly shady spot at the moment under my fledgling Star Magnolia. Hopefully it won’t be too sunny for it.

  6. Margaux Drake says

    Hellebore Porn…Oh, that’s good!!!! Keep up the hilarious and ALWAYS relevant garden intel Margaret! I think you will find random people in very far reaching parts of the world are way more interested in hellebores than you ever imagined. At least I was surprised when I saw how extremely interested these people were in me losing my canning virginity (blog post last fall). Who knew??? HA!

  7. Liz says

    Hi Margaret
    Thanks so much for introducing me to these beauties last year. I planted an on sale no label variety last year and had a dozen or so leaves which I cut off a few weeks ago since they were ragged after the winter.(zone 5b) I hope this was the right thing to do since NO new leaves have sprouted? I am thrilled that I have ONE flower!!!– a downturned white with red speckles! It looks funny and vulnerable with no leaves around it and I’m terrified that the lack of leaves means it won’t survive. What can I do to help it survive and flourish??
    Thank you for the ongoing inspiration and pleasure from your blog and I loved your book
    Liz

    • says

      No worry, Liz; the leaves won’t come till later on the orientalis types — mine are in full bloom and not a leaf to be seen yet. These are tough plants, but with their big root systems they do take awhile to settle in, so be sure if your weather dries out to give it a drink now and then this year. I see big hellebore happiness in your future. :)

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