doodle by andre: horny birds

AS I HAVE MENTIONED: Forget about Angry Birds; my yard is full of Horny Birds this spring. And when I told that to the Mad Doodler of South-Dakota-via-Britain, dear transplanted Andre Jordan, apparently I hit a chord. I know there are offcolor jokes in this vein involving words like woody and suffixes like -pecker, but I’m no dirty-minded trash mouth, you know.

It’s the birds who have spring fever; not my fault, really. Blame Andre that this woodpecker’s covering Salt-N-Pepa’s 1990 hit. But me? I didn’t do it. (And besides, I know that woodpeckers don’t get headaches, because they’re engineered to bang their head against the wall, er, tree.)

9 comments
April 28, 2015

comments

  1. Tilly says

    It’s so much fun going from growing the “perfect carrot” with the help of a Ph.D to paying attention to “horny birds” with a transplant from Britain. It’s what makes your blog the best.

  2. Ellen Hall says

    When I was in high school, my Beta Club group went to Birmingham AL for the state convention. We stopped at the Birmingham Zoo on our way back out of town. It was springtime and as soon as we got out of our cars, we could hear the bellowing from everywhere. There is nothing like visiting the zoo with your high school group – during mating season. That was a long, long time ago (over 40 years) but I have not forgotten it.

  3. Sandra R says

    Yesterday, my husband and I were watching the birds at the feeder. A male and female cardinal perched in the young yellowwood tree, a lovely picture. In swoops another male, the female exits, and the males take off in hot pursuit. My husband laughed and commented about spring and a young males fancy. My reply was “And she just wanted some lunch!”.

  4. shiner says

    There are Red Tailed Hawks living in a tree in my woods. I have watched the mating, heard the “peep” as one of them swooped in with a morsal for a hatchling. Yesterday as I was dividing perennials to give away, I heard the distinctive sound of these hawks and looked as always to watch the magesty of their soaring. One of the adults landed in a tree and I was thrilled to see a baby hawk with them. The adult flew off as the fledge flew back to the nest. WOW!

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